Homeschool Field Trips

Do you need some great homeschool fieldtrip ideas? Well, here are some of my favorite ideas. Have you done fieldtrips that were an incredible success? What about trips that were absolutely terrible? Well, do me a favor and tell us your story below.

 

8 Great Fieldtrip Suggestions for Homeschool Parents

Here are some fun ideas for homeschooling parents that will get your students out of the house and let some experts teach your children for a day. You may be surprised at how rejuvenated you feel after a fieldtrip–even though they are exhausting!!

 

1. Police Station

Hopefully you can give you children a view of the happy side of police enforcement and that will keep them from seeing the “Not-So-Happy” side!

All you need to do is call the police station and they will help you set up a tour. They are used to doing some kind of tour, so this will be an easy one.

2. Firehouse

Again, these guys are used to giving tours. So it is an easy phone call to make. This would be a good call to let one of your older children make. Help them learn how to appropriately make appointments over the phone.

3. Historic sites

I still remember my families trip to Custer’s Last Stand. I remember the feeling of reverence that was there as I learned about the number of lives that were lost and the bravery of the Native American. There were so many lessons on things like pride (the good and the bad kinds), culture, history, and more that still ring in my ears.

Here are some links to Custer’s Last Stand–because I think if you live anywhere in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, North Dakota, Colorado you should make a trip and go here:
http://custerlaststand.org

http://www.friendslittlebighorn.com/custerslaststand.htm

4. Working Farm

If you can, go when there will be lots of baby animals. The springtime is a great time to visit–as long as you don’t interrupt planting. In fact, you want to make sure when you set up this appointment that you are going when the owner or operating has time to show you around.

To set up this fieldtrip, just search for a working farm in your area and find the number. When you call, ask for the owner or operating of the farm. Some fun farms might include chicken farm, cattle/dairy farms, pig farms, and potato (or other produce) farms. Make sure that you have the farmer show you some of their HUGE equipment. This will really get your homeschool boys fired up–especially if they could drive one!!

5. Hospital or Emergency Room or Instacare

Call the main number for a local facility and ask for someone in public relations or someone that is responsible for setting up tours of the facility. The detail of the tour will depend on the facility policy and how busy they are when you come.

If you go to a hospital, make sure you ask to see the prayer room or the chapel. Some of the most gorgeous stained glass I have ever seen (except Catholic cathedrals in the Dominican Republic which were AMAZING!!!) was in a prayer room in a tucked away part of a hospital where my grandmother was recovering from a stroke.

6. Soup Kitchen or Shelter for the Homeless

Our children need opportunities like this. It will help them understand that there are those in this world that are not as blessed as they are. There are two groups that we can focus on in this life and we cannot focus on them both at the same time. There is the group that has more of something than us and the other is the group that has less. Typically, we spend most of our time focusing on the group that has more than we do, even though of the two groups it is the smaller. When we change our perspective and focus on the group that has less than we do, we begin to feel peace and contentment in our lives. Our children could all use a little more gratitude in their lives. Ultimately, being content is the only thing we need to do to be happy.

When you set this appointment up, ask for opportunities to serve. This kind of an opportunity will help your children begin to see the blessings and happiness that come from serving others.

 

Important Tips for Successful Homeschool Fieldtrips

We have all had good and bad experience on fieldtrips. You want to make sure you give your children a positive experience. Here is some advice that will help your fieldtrip succeed.

1. Let them take a camera (if that is ok with the tour) and create a presentation about the trip that they can share with someone that did not go.

2. Don’t make the trip last forever.

Remember, your children do not have your attention span. Keep it short-ish. If they are engaged, then you can stay a little longer.

3. Make it as interactive as possible.

Help your children come up with questions before hand that they can ask the tour guide. If you are the one making the appointment, ask if there are any hands-on opportunities for the children. There probably are, but the guide may not have considered them yet.

4. Let your children prepare the trip.

If you children are old enough, let them make the call and setup the appointment. If your children are younger, they could help you prepare the sack lunches. This builds anticipation and gives the children ownership of the trip.

5. Include opportunities for physical outbursts.

Give your children the opportunity to run some sprints or do a pushup contest during the tour. This will reset their attention span and help your kinesthetic learners last longer in a verbal setting.

 

Using Fieldtrips to Build Trust

One of the best reasons to do fieldtrips with your homeschool children is the opportunity to see what gets them excited. Get your children into different settings where they can experience something new. When you see them get excited about a topic or career, talk to them about it. Let them tell you why they were excited. Be excited with them. As you do that (exerting no pressure just learning with them) you will see the trust in your relationship shoot through the roof. Remember, you need to have lots of low-risk experiences with your children to build that trust. If you need a reminder about tips for building trust click this link to listen to the podcast or re-read the keys to trust building.

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